This tiger lost his stripes: General Guo Boxiong, former Vice Chairman of the Central Military Commission, was jailed for life in July 2016 for graft. Seen here in a 2006 photograph. Photo: Reuters/Yuri Gripas
This tiger lost his stripes: General Guo Boxiong, former Vice Chairman of the Central Military Commission, was jailed for life in July 2016 for graft. Seen here in a 2006 photograph. Photo: Reuters/Yuri Gripas

Catching tigers and flies

ChinaFile's project helps visualize President Xi Jinping's anti-corruption campaign, which has ensnared thousands of officials and military officers

October 22, 2016 10:12 PM (UTC+8)

ChinaFile has created an interactive graphic that explores Chinese leader Xi Jinping’s far-ranging and highly visible campaign against corruption, ensnaring thousands of officials in the government, state-owned enterprises, and the military. The tool below is intended to give users a sense of the character, scope, and pace of that campaign as well as the connections among its most prominent targets.

The data is drawn from public announcements of investigations made by the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, the government body in charge of the campaign, and its official media affiliates, as well as by other Chinese government organs. ChinaFile supplements that data with reporting from major media outlets. All of the information in the tool comes from published sources and is updated each week.

Launch the graphic into a larger window by clicking on the middle icon on the top right hand side of the bar. Click the icon on the far right of the bar to open the navigation panel. You can pick an individual anti-corruption target to explore his or her professional and geographic background, connections, and status in the disciplinary process. You can also sort the database by sector or location, as well as filter for time. For more about how the tool was built, visit the ChinaFile website. If you spot an error in the data, please submit a correction to ChinaFile.

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