Philippines | Filipinos fear extrajudicial killings, but approve of drugs war
The body of a dead man with his head wrapped in masking tape, whom police said was a victim of a drug-related vigilante execution, lays on a street in Pasay city, metro Manila. Photo: Reuters/Romeo Ranoco
The body of a dead man with his head wrapped in masking tape, whom police said was a victim of a drug-related vigilante execution, lays on a street in Pasay city, metro Manila. Photo: Reuters/Romeo Ranoco

Filipinos fear extrajudicial killings, but approve of drugs war

A convincing 88% also believed there had been a decrease in the illicit drug problem in their communities

December 19, 2016 2:44 PM (UTC+8)

Eight out of 10 Filipinos worry they or someone they know might become a victim of extrajudicial killings, an opinion poll published on Monday found, although a majority also gave President Rodrigo Duterte’s drug war an “excellent” rating.

More than 2,000 people have been killed by police in anti-narcotics operations in the Philippines since Duterte took office on July 1. Another 3,000 deaths, some attributed to masked men on motorcycles or vigilantes, are under investigation.

Social Weather Stations (SWS), an independent pollster, asked 1,500 Filipinos nationwide if they were concerned that either they or someone they knew could fall victim to an extrajudicial killing, and 78% said they were either very worried or somewhat worried.

The SWS survey was conducted with face-to-face interviews on December 3-6, with the results posted online on Monday.

Despite those fears, the survey also found Filipinos were staunchly behind Duterte’s drugs war, which has drawn international concern and a request from a United Nations human rights expert to investigate.

Duterte’s drugs war received an “excellent” mark from an overwhelming majority of respondents, a rating determined by deducting the eight percent of respondents who said they were dissatisfied from the 85 percent who were satisfied.

“I am not surprised with the conundrum that people acknowledge that the anti-drug campaign is fitting, so they allow it. But they would like fewer killings,” said Ramon Casiple, executive director of the Institute for Political and Electoral Reform.

Martin Andanar, Duterte’s communication secretary, said the government recognised concerns among Filipinos but reiterated that the killings were not state-sponsored.

“Rest assured that the Duterte administration respects the law and upholds the basic rights of our people, regardless of beliefs and political persuasion,” he said in a statement.

The survey, which had a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percent, also found 71% felt it was important to keep those suspected of drug use or drug trafficking alive. A similar figure said the extrajudicial killings were a serious problem.

A convincing 88% also believed there had been a decrease in the illicit drug problem in their communities.

The firebrand leader has said he personally killed criminals while he was mayor of southern Davao City.

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