South Korea | On Jeju, Korea's island of ghosts, the dead finally find a voice
  • 4000 gravestones to the missing of the Jeju massacre stand at the April 3 Peace Park. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    4000 gravestones to the missing of the Jeju massacre stand at the April 3 Peace Park. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • Doomed civilians walk into darkness - sculpture at Jeju Peace Museum; with 4,000 gravestones for those missing after the Jeju massacre. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    Doomed civilians walk into darkness - sculpture at Jeju Peace Museum; with 4,000 gravestones for those missing after the Jeju massacre. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • Visitors to the Peace Museum enter through a reproduction of a volcanic cave, replicating the hiding places where civilians and partisans hid from the troops hunting them. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    Visitors to the Peace Museum enter through a reproduction of a volcanic cave, replicating the hiding places where civilians and partisans hid from the troops hunting them. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • Images of the dead at the Peace Museum. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    Images of the dead at the Peace Museum. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • A photo in the Peace Museum shows US officers, who authorized a crackdown that became a massacre. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    A photo in the Peace Museum shows US officers, who authorized a crackdown that became a massacre. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • A guide stands in front of a pit where leftists were executed during the early stage of the Korean War. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    A guide stands in front of a pit where leftists were executed during the early stage of the Korean War. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • A guide points to one of the forest caves where civilians hid from security forces. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    A guide points to one of the forest caves where civilians hid from security forces. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • Visitors watch an animation of the opening of the April 3 massacre at the Peace Museum. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    Visitors watch an animation of the opening of the April 3 massacre at the Peace Museum. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • An artist’s rendition of troops hunting civilians in the volcanic caves that dot the island. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    An artist’s rendition of troops hunting civilians in the volcanic caves that dot the island. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • Survivor Go Wan-soon stands in front of the memorial to the dead children of Bukchon village. Photo: Asia Times /Andrew Salmon
    Survivor Go Wan-soon stands in front of the memorial to the dead children of Bukchon village. Photo: Asia Times /Andrew Salmon
  • The memorial in Bukchon to children slain in the village. It replicates their scattered bodies. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    The memorial in Bukchon to children slain in the village. It replicates their scattered bodies. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • A monument of black rock to the dead children of Bukchon Village. Villages have placed gifts of toys and sweets in its recesses. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    A monument of black rock to the dead children of Bukchon Village. Villages have placed gifts of toys and sweets in its recesses. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • A diorama in the Peace Museum shows terrified civilians heading for the hills to avoid a sweep by security forces. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    A diorama in the Peace Museum shows terrified civilians heading for the hills to avoid a sweep by security forces. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • A statue of local volcanic rock in Bukchon portrays a dead mother nursing a baby. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    A statue of local volcanic rock in Bukchon portrays a dead mother nursing a baby. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • A peace statue stands in front of WWII era Japanese aircraft bunkers. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    A peace statue stands in front of WWII era Japanese aircraft bunkers. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • The memorial altar at the Jeju Peace Memorial was visited today by President Moon Jae-in on the 70th anniversary of the mass killings. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    The memorial altar at the Jeju Peace Memorial was visited today by President Moon Jae-in on the 70th anniversary of the mass killings. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • A visitor surveys gruesome artwork at the Peace Museum. Photo: Andrew Salmon
    A visitor surveys gruesome artwork at the Peace Museum. Photo: Andrew Salmon
  • Methods of killing ranged from shooting to hanging to burning to suffocation. Photo: Andrew Salmon for Asia Times
    Methods of killing ranged from shooting to hanging to burning to suffocation. Photo: Andrew Salmon for Asia Times
  • A guide stands beside a massacre memorial on Jeju Island. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    A guide stands beside a massacre memorial on Jeju Island. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • Visitors to Jeju Island may be shocked to learn that the runway at the international airport paves over mass graves. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    Visitors to Jeju Island may be shocked to learn that the runway at the international airport paves over mass graves. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
  • An early monument to the massacre was torn down by South Korea’s authoritarian government as part of efforts to cover up the scale of the killings. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon
    An early monument to the massacre was torn down by South Korea’s authoritarian government as part of efforts to cover up the scale of the killings. Photo: Asia Times/ Andrew Salmon

On Jeju, Korea’s island of ghosts, the dead finally find a voice

70 years ago, an estimated 30,000 people were massacred in an anti-communist blitz on today's vacation island of Jeju. Now, fingers point at America

April 3, 2018 6:18 PM (UTC+8)
Concept, design & development by
Powered by