South Korea | In search of serenity? Retreat into a Buddhist temple
  • The Woljeongsa Temple sits in the middle of the mountainous Odasan National Park one hour’s drive north of  PyeongChang, South Korea. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
    The Woljeongsa Temple sits in the middle of the mountainous Odasan National Park one hour’s drive north of PyeongChang, South Korea. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
  • A temple courtyeard. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
    A temple courtyeard. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
  • Guest rooms at Woljeongsa Temple may be spartan, but the structures in which guest rooms are located are elaborately constructed. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
    Guest rooms at Woljeongsa Temple may be spartan, but the structures in which guest rooms are located are elaborately constructed. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
  • Guest rooms are spartan with little more than pegs on the wall for clothing and basic 
bedding. Rooms are warmed by Korean “ondol” beneath the floors. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
    Guest rooms are spartan with little more than pegs on the wall for clothing and basic bedding. Rooms are warmed by Korean “ondol” beneath the floors. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
  • Wooded pathways extending from the temple into the Odasan National park are lined in sections with stacked rocks representing prayers to Lord Buddha and other inspirational thoughts. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
    Wooded pathways extending from the temple into the Odasan National park are lined in sections with stacked rocks representing prayers to Lord Buddha and other inspirational thoughts. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
  • Woljeongsa’s octagonal, nine-story pagoda ranks No. 48 on Korea’s list of National Treasures. The pagoda has bronze wind bells and and a gilt bronze finish and is typical of pagodas built in Korea’s Goryeo Kingdom established in 918 AD. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
    Woljeongsa’s octagonal, nine-story pagoda ranks No. 48 on Korea’s list of National Treasures. The pagoda has bronze wind bells and and a gilt bronze finish and is typical of pagodas built in Korea’s Goryeo Kingdom established in 918 AD. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
  • Resident monks walk silently about the temple when not meditating. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
    Resident monks walk silently about the temple when not meditating. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
  • Guests are encouraged to hike the wooded trails leading into the Odasan National Park surrounding the temple. Guests are provided with loose fitting clothing that masks individual styles. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
    Guests are encouraged to hike the wooded trails leading into the Odasan National Park surrounding the temple. Guests are provided with loose fitting clothing that masks individual styles. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
  • Pedestrian bridge leading to the Woljeongsa Temple across a rocky creek. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
    Pedestrian bridge leading to the Woljeongsa Temple across a rocky creek. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
  • Visitors are welcome to stroll about the courtyards during the day, visit the temple 
museum and photograph and Dharma Bell that calls people to prayer. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times
    Visitors are welcome to stroll about the courtyards during the day, visit the temple museum and photograph and Dharma Bell that calls people to prayer. Photo: David DeVoss/Asia Times

In search of serenity? Retreat into a Buddhist temple

South Korea is home to 20 spiritual sanctuaries that can accommodate English-speaking overnight visitors during the Pyeongchang Olympics 

February 19, 2018 11:45 AM (UTC+8)
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