South Korean coastguard officers operate on their vessel at the site where the capsized passenger ship Sewol sank, as fishing boats emit light during the night rescue operation in Jindo April 22, 2014. The Sewol ferry sank last Wednesday on a routine trip south from the port of Incheon to the traditional honeymoon island of Jeju. Of the 476 passengers and crew on board, 339 were children and teachers on a high school outing. Only 174 people have been rescued and the remainder are all presumed to have drowned. REUTERS/Issei Kato (SOUTH KOREA - Tags: DISASTER MARITIME TRANSPORT)

South Korean coastguard officers operate on their vessel at the site where the capsized passenger ship Sewol sank, as fishing boats emit light during the night rescue operation in Jindo April 22, 2014. The Sewol ferry sank last Wednesday on a routine trip south from the port of Incheon to the traditional honeymoon island of Jeju. Of the 476 passengers and crew on board, 339 were children and teachers on a high school outing. Only 174 people have been rescued and the remainder are all presumed to have drowned. REUTERS/Issei Kato (SOUTH KOREA – Tags: DISASTER MARITIME TRANSPORT)

The South Korean coastguard is taking a tougher stand against illegal fishing. Photo: Reuters/Issei Kato

November 2, 2016 4:00 PM (UTC+8)