• Christine Meeusen, 57, (right), and India Delgado, or Sister Eevee, smoke a joint. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
    Christine Meeusen, 57, (right), and India Delgado, or Sister Eevee, smoke a joint. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
  • Sister Kate (left), Sister Freya (right) and Sister Eevee check drying hemp. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
    Sister Kate (left), Sister Freya (right) and Sister Eevee check drying hemp. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
  • Sister Eevee carries hemp to the kitchen. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
    Sister Eevee carries hemp to the kitchen. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
  • Christine Meeusen, 57, (right), Sister Freya (left) and Sister Eevee smoke. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
    Christine Meeusen, 57, (right), Sister Freya (left) and Sister Eevee smoke. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
  • Sister Kate (right), Desiree Calderon, or Sister Freya, and India Delgado, or Sister Eevee, check drying hemp. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
    Sister Kate (right), Desiree Calderon, or Sister Freya, and India Delgado, or Sister Eevee, check drying hemp. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
  • India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, trims hemp in the kitchen. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
    India Delgado, who goes by the name Sister Eevee, trims hemp in the kitchen. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
  • Sister Kate (Christine Meeusen, left) and Sister Eevee trim hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
    Sister Kate (Christine Meeusen, left) and Sister Eevee trim hemp in the kitchen at Sisters of the Valley. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
  • California “weed nun” Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (right), with Sister Eevee, check drying hemp. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
    California “weed nun” Christine Meeusen, 57, who goes by the name Sister Kate (right), with Sister Eevee, check drying hemp. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
  • Sister Kate checks hemp that is drying. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
    Sister Kate checks hemp that is drying. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
  • Sister Freya with the CBD salve made from hemp at Sisters of the Valley. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
    Sister Freya with the CBD salve made from hemp at Sisters of the Valley. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
  • Sister Kate smells the hemp. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson
    Sister Kate smells the hemp. Photo: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

Taking up a new habit

Sisters of the Valley would appear to be affiliated with a religious order, but they are not. Even so it is an odd image to see ‘nuns’ produce cannabis products

April 21, 2017 6:19 PM (UTC+8)

A California outfit, Sisters of the Valley, would appear to be affiliated with a religious order but they are not. Despite this, they dress in nuns’ habits and produce cannabis-based products on their farm near Merced, California.

According to their website, the sisters sustain their farm operations and their compassionate activism by making products for the people in a spiritual environment.

The sisters respect the breadth and depth of the gifts of Mother Earth and work hard to bridge the gap between her and her suffering people, the site says.

The site also says the sisters prepare all of their products during moon cycles, according to ancient wisdom. They are activists on a mission to empower people to heal themselves. The site also said its products contain virtually no THC, are not psychoactive, they will not get a person ‘high’ and they will not cause a person to fail a drug test.

Marijuana for both recreational and medical uses is legal in California.

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