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    China Business
     Nov 13, '13


Will debt derail Abenomics?
By Michael Pettis

Beijing-based economist Michael Pettis has carved out through his "China Financial Markets" blog a distinct position with his commentaries on the Chinese economy, notably with his consideration of the difficulties it faces with its necessary rebalancing towards a more consumption-based model. Asia Times Online here draws the attention of Pettis' latest insightful analysis to a wider public.

It seems to me that one of the automatic, if not always intended, consequences of Abenomics is to force up Japan's current account surplus, and in fact to force it up substantially. This will



have to do at least in part with deciding how to manage the country's enormous government debt burden, which easily exceeds 200% of the country's GDP.

If I am right, this should create two concerns. First, in a world struggling with insufficient demand and excess capacity, and in which the growth strategies of too many countries implicitly involve a significant increase in exports relative to imports, a major increase in Japan's current account surplus could easily derail growth recovery elsewhere.

The US for example has to worry that policies aimed at increasing domestic demand don't simply result in rising debt as US demand bleeds out through the current account, while both China and Europe need strong external sectors to make their own difficult domestic adjustments less painful.

Second, it is not obvious that the world will be able to absorb a significant increase in the Japanese exports, and if Abenomics implicitly forces up the Japanese savings rate relative to investment (which is all that we mean when we say that economic policies force up current account surpluses), these policies can resolve themselves either in the form of high growth and soaring exports, or much lower growth and slowing imports.

The former implies that Abenomics will be successful, while the latter that it will fail. It is not obvious, in other words, that Abenomics can succeed in a world of weak demand, and its failure is likely to make Japan's domestic imbalances worse, not better. ... More.

Michael Pettis is a Senior Associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and a finance professor at Peking University's Guanghua School of Management, where he specializes in Chinese financial markets. He has taught, from 2002 to 2004, at Tsinghua University's School of Economics and Management and, from 1992 to 2001, at Columbia University's Graduate School of Business. He is also Chief Strategist at Guosen Securities (HK), a Shenzhen-based investment bank.

(Reprinted with permission. For Michael Pettis' blog, see here.

(Copyright 2013 Michael Pettis)





 

 

 
 



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