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The ‘correlation of forces’ threatening capitalism

Norman A. Bailey October 13, 2016 9:23 PM (UTC+8)
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Karl Marx, following Hegel, famously made constant reference to the “correlation of forces” that were going to cause, according to him, the collapse of the capitalist system and the inauguration of the workers’ paradise.

The current correlation of forces would have thrilled Marx. It includes the following toxic elements:

  • The most ridiculous, stupid, idiotic, surrealistic and extremely dangerous presidential election in American history. The world’s premier economic and military power is going through an electoral exercise that would shame a comedy writer as being too exaggerated.
  • This electoral farce will lead inexorably to a third failed presidency in a row. The country which strode like a colossus across the global scene at the dawn of the twenty-first century is now a crippled giant of debt, denial, uncertainty, stagnation and social and racial unrest that would have astonished someone contemplating the future in the year 2000.
  • In the light of the precipitous decline of the United States and of Europe, Russia and China are flexing their authoritarian muscles across eastern Europe, the Middle East and the Pacific rim. India and Pakistan threaten each other across the Kashmir cease-fire line. North Korea increases its nuclear arsenal and the means of delivering it. Iran was granted the nuclear green light by the decadent West. The threat of nuclear war has never been stronger.
  • Tens of millions of desperate men and women throughout the Western world, struggling with rampant concentration of wealth in ever-smaller numbers of people and the inevitable social and economic results of rapidly-developing technologies, are resorting to extreme political action of both the right and the left. Indeed, those labels don’t mean much any more.
  • The Middle East and North Africa are increasingly a theater of spectacular barbarism and savagery that would have shamed a Neanderthal. The center not only “cannot hold” but is rapidly disappearing in much of the region.
  • What I call World War IV, between Western civilization and radical Islam (the Cold War was World War III), is increasingly being lost by the West, not so much militarily as ideologically, as hordes of Western politicians, intellectuals and academics surrender Western values and embrace Islamic ideals in what can only be described as an orgy of appeasement and surrender.

This correlation of forces, it will undoubtedly be noted, is entirely negative. In recent world history it can only be compared to the late 1930’s. How that worked out need not be emphasized.

What are the chances of reversal and renewal? Very slim indeed. A new anti-radical trend in Latin America. A vital Israel and India. Yes, there are contrary developments but compared to the list above they are meager indeed. What is needed is a new, vigorous and decisive leadership in the West and that is not only not happening, but the opposite, as noted, is happening. The political forces of negativism, appeasement of the enemy, and extremism are on the rise everywhere. An entire generation is being indoctrinated with anti-Western values and from them nothing can be expected but more of the same. Or worse.

Lesson for the individual? Be afraid. Be very afraid. And act accordingly in your physical and financial planning.

Norman A. Bailey
Norman A. Bailey is President of the Institute for Global Economic Growth, the author of numerous books and articles and recipient of several honorary degrees, medals and awards and two orders of knighthood. He also teaches economic statecraft at The Institute of World Politics and has experience on the staff of the National Security Council at the White House, in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, and in business, consulting and finance.
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