Middle East | After Syria strike, will Trump end Obama’s Yemen policy?

After Syria strike, will Trump end Obama’s Yemen policy?

Salman Rafi April 8, 2017 6:06 PM (UTC+8)
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After giving a clear indication of what the Trump administration is prepared to do in Syria, one is tempted to raise a question about what they will and can go for in Yemen?

While the US’ Syria strike, coming in the aftermath of a far-from-confirmed gas attack by the Syrian government, certainly has raised the level of tension with Russia and Iran, the strike certainly has left a very positive impact on the dwindling US relations with its traditional allies in the Gulf, particularly Saudi Arabia.

Will the US use the same policy in Yemen?

There are high chances that the US might think of increasing its involvement in Yemen as well.

This is especially so because of the growing tension between Iran and the US and the fact that Iran is involved in the Yemeni theatre, too.

Already the US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis has asked for, in a meno to the US national security advisor, lifting the Obama-era sanctions that limit the extent of support the US can provide to the Arab-alliance engaged in a protracted war with the Houthis.

According to it, this is would help the US combat a “common threat.”

Already the Trump administration has ended the Obama-era policy of practicing restraint vis-a-vis Syria, how long will it take them to do the same vis-a-vis Yemen.

While the US government is divided on the question, the US military command is certainly pressing for what is being seen a fundamental change in the policy.

Is it the coming of a second front against Iran and its allies (Russia)?

Salman Rafi
Salman Rafi Sheikh is an independent journalist and a research analyst of international relations and Pakistan affairs. His area of interest is South and West Asian Geo-politics, the foreign policies of major powers, and Pakistani politics. He can be reached at salmanrafisheikh@hotmail.com
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